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Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 13:52
The ingredients and science behind growth factor-based topicals.By Inga HansenGrowth factor-BASED serums and creams have become ubiquitous in topical antiaging skin care. But what these different products contain can vary widely. Some products contain actual growth factors—either animal- or plant-derived—and others use so-called “signaling” ingredients, typically peptides that trigger the cells in a manner similar to naturally occurring growth factors. In all cases, the goal is to combat the changes that occur in aging skin
https://www.medestheticsmag.com/restoring-growth
Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 13:52
The ingredients and science behind growth factor-based topicals.By Inga HansenGrowth factor-BASED serums and creams have become ubiquitous in topical antiaging skin care. But what these different products contain can vary widely. Some products contain actual growth factors—either animal- or plant-derived—and others use so-called “signaling” ingredients, typically peptides that trigger the cells in a manner similar to naturally occurring growth factors. In all cases, the goal is to combat the changes that occur in aging skin
https://www.medestheticsmag.com/restoring-growth
Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 13:36
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the hyaluronic acid (HA) dermal filler Restylane Lyft (Nestlé Skin Health) for the correction of age-related volume loss in the back of the hands for patients over the age of 21. It is the first HA injectable gel to be FDA-approved for restoring fullness to the back of the hands.
https://www.medestheticsmag.com/restylane-lyft-approved-hands

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Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 13:36
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the hyaluronic acid (HA) dermal filler Restylane Lyft (Nestlé Skin Health) for the correction of age-related volume loss in the back of the hands for patients over the age of 21. It is the first HA injectable gel to be FDA-approved for restoring fullness to the back of the hands.
https://www.medestheticsmag.com/restylane-lyft-approved-hands
Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 13:32
Revance Therapeutics has established four new positions at the company as it prepares for the launch and commercialization of its daxibotulinumtoxinA injectable (RT002) for the treatment of glabellar lines.
https://www.medestheticsmag.com/revance-gears-launch-rt002-neurotoxin
Thursday, May 24, 2018 - 13:32
Revance Therapeutics has established four new positions at the company as it prepares for the launch and commercialization of its daxibotulinumtoxinA injectable (RT002) for the treatment of glabellar lines.
https://www.medestheticsmag.com/revance-gears-launch-rt002-neurotoxin

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Thursday, May 17, 2018 - 12:25
The approval of Evolus’ DWP-450 (prabotulinumtoxinA) has hit a snag, reportedly due to issues at the appointed manufacturing facility. The U.S. Food & Drug Administration issued a complete response letter (CRL) to the company’s biologic license application for DWP-450 outlining concerns that must be addressed before the FDA can approve the new neurotoxin for marketing in the U.S.
https://www.medestheticsmag.com/evolus-vows-move-forward-fda-fails-approve-its-neurotoxin
Thursday, May 17, 2018 - 12:23
Legal, ethical and informed consent considerations when using products off-label. By Alex R. Thiersch, JDUsing pharmaceuticals “off-label”—that is, in ways that are not specified by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)—is technically legal but somewhat controversial in aesthetic medicine. Decisions regarding off-label usage should be based on current standards of care, the best interest of the patient, and your own training and expertise within the medical field. Following are some important points to consider when examining the off-label use of prescription products in your...
https://www.medestheticsmag.com/legal-issues-label-uses
Thursday, May 17, 2018 - 12:23
Legal, ethical and informed consent considerations when using products off-label. By Alex R. Thiersch, JDUsing pharmaceuticals “off-label”—that is, in ways that are not specified by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)—is technically legal but somewhat controversial in aesthetic medicine. Decisions regarding off-label usage should be based on current standards of care, the best interest of the patient, and your own training and expertise within the medical field. Following are some important points to consider when examining the off-label use of prescription products in your...
https://www.medestheticsmag.com/legal-issues-label-uses

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